SAHM 2021 Standard Virtual Conference Package

TBD -Standard Virtual Conference Package

  • Poster #76: “It just causes us to communicate more”: A Qualitative Exploration of Parent and Youth Perspectives on Remote Glucose Monitoring in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Poster #76: “It just causes us to communicate more”: A Qualitative Exploration of Parent and Youth Perspectives on Remote Glucose Monitoring in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Poster #76: “It just causes us to communicate more”: A Qualitative Exploration of Parent and Youth Perspectives on Remote Glucose Monitoring in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

  • Agents of Peace - Youth Participatory Action Research Frameworks in Promoting Social Justice

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: Agents of Peace - Youth Participatory Action Research Frameworks in Promoting Social Justice

    Agents of Peace - Youth Participatory Action Research Frameworks in Promoting ‎Social Justice

    Track: Youth Empowerment & Engagement
    Live ONLY


    Session Leaders: Nicholas Szoko, MD, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh; Namita Dwarakanath, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Nabila Jamal Orozco, University of Pittsburgh; Elizabeth Miller, MD, PhD, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh 

    Description: Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) represents a distinct subtype of ‎community-partnered participatory research through which young people are engaged ‎in the process of identifying, analyzing, and addressing challenges in their ‎environment. YPAR adapts a youth empowerment framework to promote increased ‎self-efficacy, sense of purpose, and collective consciousness among its participants. ‎When effective power-sharing between young people and adult stakeholders occurs, ‎young people become essential advocates for contextual social change. The purpose ‎of this session is to examine how youth-led interventions can be designed, facilitated, ‎and implemented to generate trauma-sensitive responses to inequity. Attendees will ‎develop competency in basic YPAR methodology, facilitation techniques, and program ‎evaluation. The previous iteration of this workshop, accepted to the 2020 Annual ‎Meeting, focused primarily on school climate, as this was the initial target of our ‎institution’s YPAR model. We have since expanded programming to more schools and ‎community centers, where youth have launched diverse projects including creating ‎peer-facilitated mental health support groups, constructing decompression rooms, ‎generating art for surrounding neighborhoods, organizing food drives, writing op-eds to ‎local newspapers, and assessing community strengths and needs in the setting of ‎COVID-19. As such, we will examine how YPAR can be adapted to engage young ‎people in addressing a greater breadth and depth of topics in various settings. Our ‎workshop will incorporate facilitators from diverse disciplines, and we will center youth ‎voice through existing written and video narratives from young people with whom we ‎have partnered. 
    ‎ 
    Learning Objectives:  

    1. Define youth empowerment, positive youth development, and Youth Participatory ‎Action Research (YPAR).
    2. Identify key processes and common pitfalls with YPAR implementation.
    3. Apply YPAR methodologies to conversations on social justice.‎

    Elizabeth Miller

    Nabila Jamal Orozco

    Namita Dwarakanath

    Nicholas Szoko

  • Celebrating Our Magic: Resources for American Indian and Alaska Native Two Spirit and LGBTQ Youth, their relatives, and their health care providers

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: Celebrating Our Magic: Resources for American Indian and Alaska Native Two Spirit and LGBTQ Youth, their relatives, and their health care providers

    Celebrating Our Magic: Resources for American Indian and Alaska Native Two Spirit ‎and LGBTQ Youth, their relatives, and their health care providers

    Track: Public Health/Advocacy
    Live ONLY; session recording will not be available


    Session Leaders: Alessandra Angelino, MD, MPH, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
    Morgan Thomas, BS, BA, MFA, Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board; Martha F. Perry, MD, University of North Carolina
    Itai Jeffries, PhD, Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board; Nikki Ferrin

    Description: LGBTQ youth are marginalized in many communities. In particular, Two Spirit and ‎LGBTQ youth in AI/AN communities are disproportionately affected by negative ‎physical and mental health outcomes. Providers serving LGBTQ communities benefit ‎from a deeper understanding of the unique challenges faced by Two Spirit and LGBTQ ‎youth. In addition, lessons learned from serving this community can assist providers ‎serving all LGTBQ youth. This session will increase participant awareness of the ‎disproportionate barriers AI/AN Two Spirit and LGBTQ youth face accessing ‎healthcare, particularly related to gender-affirming care. Information shared may be ‎applicable to participants regardless of geographic location given that AI/AN youth ‎presently live in urban, rural, and reservation environments. Session content has ‎implications for improving clinical practice, making medical education more inclusive, ‎increasing public health interventions in this community, and encouraging advocacy ‎and policy interventions addressing AI/AN Two Spirit and LGBTQ youth. Presenters ‎will utilize a strengths-based, resilience focused approach that builds upon the ‎resources and knowledge present in AI/AN communities. The culturally-driven ‎resources shared can also be adopted by LGBTQ youth and practitioners in ‎Indigenous communities in other nations. Resources may also be adapted to meet the ‎needs of other underrepresented minority groups within the US. The resources and ‎stories shared in this presentation, including the Toolkit and videos, were developed ‎with significant input from Native Two Spirit and LGBTQ adolescents and young ‎adults. Lessons learned from this session may benefit any provider working with ‎LGBTQ youth and/or adolescents from diverse backgrounds. 
    ‎ 
    Learning Objectives:

    1. Define Two Spirit and describe the impact of history and historical trauma on American ‎Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) concepts of gender and identity. 
    2. Identify barriers AI/AN youth face accessing gender-affirming care in order to develop ‎strategies for delivering improved health care and promoting health equity. 
    3. Describe how best practices from AI/AN communities focused on resilience and ‎resource sharing can be expanded upon and utilized in the broader LGBTQ ‎community.‎‎
  • All Together Now: Mapping a Multidisciplinary Agenda to TRANSform the Future Care of Transgender and Gender Diverse Youth

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: All Together Now: Mapping a Multidisciplinary Agenda to TRANSform the Future Care of Transgender and Gender Diverse Youth

    All Together Now: Mapping a Multidisciplinary Agenda to TRANSform the Future Care ‎of Transgender and Gender Diverse Youth

    View session recording

    Track: Clinical Advances
    Eligible for CME/CE credits = 1.0


    Session Leaders: Rachel D. Snedecor, MD, MS, Cincinnati Children's Medical Center; Lee Ann Conard, RPh, DO, MPH, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Sarah Corathers, MD, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Armand Antommaria, MD, PhD, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Bridget Hagood, Psy.D., Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Evelyn Heflin, LISW-S, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Sue Jelinek, M.Divv, BCC, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center 

    Description: Our Transgender Health Clinic was established in 2013 with the cooperation of a ‎multidisciplinary team. Over time, the clinic and patient population have grown ‎exponentially, with nearly two thousand patients seen in the clinic and drawing from a ‎six state area. During this workshop, members of the team from varying disciplines will ‎discuss current challenges that are faced in the field, along with plans to innovate and ‎evolve the future of gender health in a region and political climate that may provide ‎their own challenges.

    The voices of patients and their families will be represented ‎throughout to discuss their journeys with the team and visions for the future of gender ‎affirming care. A patient and family will share their story and team interactions via ‎multimedia. Featured teams and their associated topics will include:

    1. Medicine ‎‎(Adolescent Medicine, Endocrinology): Cementing the bonds of a multidisciplinary ‎team, the future of coproduction, and patient education in the age of the Internet (when ‎patients have researched treatments online and have preconceived expectations).
    2. ‎Ethics: Ethical considerations in clinical operation, recommendations in response to ‎negative messages, and working against harmful legislation (such as a proposed bill in ‎‎2019 making it a felony to treat gender diverse youth)
    3. Mental Health Professionals ‎‎(Psychology/Social Work): A discussion on trauma based approaches and patient ‎support in a time charged with uncertainty, a global pandemic, and racial tension
    4. ‎Pastoral Care: The incorporation of pastoral care, addressing spiritual needs/struggles, ‎and building bridges to understanding in patients and families 

    ‎Learning Objectives:  

    1. Explore the current challenges faced by a multidisciplinary team caring for transgender ‎and gender diverse youth, with a focus on acknowledging the diverse perspectives ‎and skill sets offered by team members of various backgrounds. 
    2. Examine the creation, functionality, and maintenance of a multidisciplinary team when ‎it comes to gender affirming care. 
    3. Apply the skills from various fields presented in this session towards their own clinical ‎practices when addressing concerns associated with spiritual needs, mental health, ‎ethical conundrums, patient education, and anticipating future needs.‎

    Rachel Snedecor

    Armand Antommaria

    Sarah Corathers

    Lee Ann Conard

    Bridget Hagood

    Sue Jelinek

    Evelyn Heflin

  • Design with Youth, for Youth: Using youth-driven design to co-design health programming with young people.

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: Design with Youth, for Youth: Using youth-driven design to co-design health programming with young people.

    Design with Youth, for Youth: Using youth-driven design to co-design health ‎programming with young people

    Track: Youth Empowerment & Engagement
    Eligible for CME/CE Credits = 1.0
    Live ONLY; session recording will not be available


    Session Leaders: Rebecca Hope, MBCHB, MPH, YLabs

    Description: Meaningful youth engagement is recommended broadly, but often adolescent health ‎practitioners and policymakers are not equipped with the tools and techniques to do ‎this effectively. Through an interactive approach and case studies, this workshop will ‎introduce participants to the principles and practice of youth-driven design for ‎adolescent health programming. Youth-driven design is based on a human-centered ‎design methodology adapted to meet the needs of youth people and engage them ‎intensively, equitably, and sensitively in the co-design process, including on taboo or ‎stigmatized topics. It is intentionally multidisciplinary in nature and people with diverse ‎backgrounds and experiences are encouraged to attend, and especially young people ‎leading change in their communities. We will use real-world case studies with a focus ‎on public health practice and will utilize examples of various ways HCD has been ‎employed in public health products, communications, services, organizational ‎strategies, and business models. 

    Learning Objectives: 

    1. Practice design research methods and apply appropriate frameworks to understand ‎young people's needs in health programming and equitably and sensitively engage ‎youth in co-design processes. 
    2. Synthesize insights to uncover opportunities for interventions to improve young ‎people's health. 
    3. Hear case studies and examples of how to prototype and refine health innovations ‎with young people.‎

    Rebecca Hope

    Shola Olabode-Dada

  • The COVID-19 Pandemic and Adolescent Nutritional Health: "Unmasking" Nutritional ‎Disparities

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: The COVID-19 Pandemic and Adolescent Nutritional Health: "Unmasking" Nutritional ‎Disparities

    The COVID-19 Pandemic and Adolescent Nutritional Health: "Unmasking" Nutritional ‎Disparities

    Track: Clinical Core Topics
    Eligible for CME/CE Credits = 1.0
    Live ONLY; recording will not be available


    Session Leaders: Maya Kumar, MD, University of California San Diego; Taylor Argo, MD, University of Minnesota; Jane Chang, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College; Rebecca Chermak, PsyD, Tampa General Hospital + University of South Florida; Alicia Docter, MS, RDN, CD, University of Washington; Preeti Galagali, MBBS, MD, Bangalore Adolescent Care and Counselling Centre; Janice Key, MD, Medical University of South Carolina; Amy Weiss, MD, MPH, University of South Florida; Annemarie Swamy, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University

    Description: For adolescents worldwide, the COVID crisis has also been a nutrition crisis. ‎Skyrocketing unemployment, economic collapse, rising food prices, and disruption of ‎food supply chains have led to a dramatic rise in food insecurity in both high-income ‎countries (HICs) and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). School closures have ‎threatened school-based nutrition programs on which many adolescents depend. ‎Sheltering in place and increased use of online education has decreased physical ‎activity and increased screen time for many adolescents, while other adolescents may ‎over-exercise to cope with the loss of normal activities. Isolation, anxiety, depression, ‎and increased exposure to misleading social media may lead to poor body image, ‎restrictive eating, emotional and/or binge eating, and food hoarding. In this workshop, a ‎multidisciplinary panel of providers from the SAHM Nutrition Committee will review the ‎scope of the global nutrition crisis. Following brief didactics, facilitated interactive small ‎group discussions will explore the impact of the COVID crisis on a) food insecurity in ‎HICs; b) food insecurity in LMICs; c) school-based nutrition; d) physical activity and ‎screen time; and e) disordered eating. In the spirit of “mapping an agenda to transform ‎the future of adolescent health,” participants will learn clinical strategies for identifying ‎adolescents at increased nutritional risk and providing appropriate intervention. They ‎will also discuss advocacy, research, and public health opportunities to improve global ‎access to adequate nutrition and safe physical activity for adolescents in the post-‎COVID era. This workshop is intended for adolescent health clinicians and ‎researchers from all disciplines.

    Learning Objectives:  

    1. Learn the pathways by which the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened food insecurity, ‎physical inactivity, and disordered eating among adolescents in both high-income ‎countries (HICs) and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). 
    2. Review clinical strategies for identifying adolescents at nutritional risk during the ‎COVID-19 crisis and implementing effective interventions. 
    3. Explore research, public health, and advocacy initiatives and partnerships which will ‎be necessary to improve adolescent nutritional health globally, both now and in the ‎post-COVID era.‎‎

    Alicia Docter

    Amy Weiss

    Annemarie Swamy

    Jane Chang

    Janice Key

    Maya Kumar

    Preeti Galagali

    Rebecca Chermak

    Taylor Argo

  • Racism 101 And More: Mapping the Intersection of Racial Identity, Medicine, and Education through the Lens of Youth and Educators

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/16/2021

    Workshop: Racism 101 And More: Mapping the Intersection of Racial Identity, Medicine, and Education through the Lens of Youth and Educators

    Racism 101 And More: Mapping the Intersection of Racial Identity, Medicine, and ‎Education through the Lens of Youth and Educators

    View Session Recording

    Track: Professional Development/Training/Education
    Eligible for CME/CE credits = 1.0


    Session Leaders: Fareeda Haamid, DO, Nationwide Children's Hospital; Deena Chisolm, Ph.D., Nationwide Children’s Hospital; Valencia Walker, MD, MPH, Nationwide Children’s Hospital; Jennifer Walton, MD, MPH, Nationwide Children’s Hospital; Aurelia C. H. Wood, MD, Nationwide Children’s Hospital

    Description: This workshop aims to empower attendees grappling with the realities of racial discord ‎in medical, educational, and other therapeutic settings. The session builds from the ‎premise that meaningful efforts to transform the future of adolescent health begin with ‎equipping healthcare professionals with the historical context of race, racism, and ‎inequities in health literacy. The workshop guides participants towards thoughtful ‎considerations for the lived experiences of youth and those tasked with ensuring their ‎education and well-being. The session creatively and seamlessly weaves recently ‎obtained interviews from youth and educators to facilitate solution-based dialogue ‎among attendees. This innovative and compelling workshop seeks to target ‎participants interested in actionable steps for dismantling current health inequities ‎originally shaped by historical injustices.

    This workshop prioritizes the creation of respectful ‎environments to foster crucial conversations. As experienced facilitators, the session ‎leaders engage with this challenging topic in a welcoming manner for attendees. ‎Participants completing the workshop should leave emboldened to affect positive ‎change against racism and health inequities through their career endeavors.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe the historical roles of science and medicine in creating race as a biological ‎construct. 
    2. Compare and contrast theories examining the formation of racial awareness across ‎developmental stages. 
    3. Amplify the lived racial experiences of diverse youth and educators through personal ‎storytelling to promote positive racial identity formation and health literacy among ‎adolescents‎

    Aurelia Wood

    Fareeda Haamid

    Jennifer Walton

    Valencia Walker

    Deena Chisolm

  • Youth Perspectives and Provider Messaging within the Changing Landscape of Legalized Recreational Marijuana

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: Youth Perspectives and Provider Messaging within the Changing Landscape of Legalized Recreational Marijuana

    Youth Perspectives and Provider Messaging within the Changing Landscape of ‎Legalized Recreational Marijuana

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    Track: Youth Empowerment & Engagement
    Eligible for CME/CE credits = 1.0


    Session Leaders: Jenni Lane, MA, University of Michigan; Catherine Miller, MD, University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital

    Description: Data concerning the impact of increased recreational marijuana legalization on ‎adolescent attitudes and marijuana use is scant, but emerging. Medical and mental ‎health providers and other youth-serving professionals – along with adolescents and ‎parents – are navigating this new landscape without a roadmap. This workshop will ‎address the biases, uncertainties, and best practices for communicating with youth ‎around the topic. Youth will co-facilitate the workshop, sharing their perspectives about ‎current forms of marijuana use, social norms, and what health messaging they find ‎effective. Using a strengths-based approach to risk, the session will both acknowledge ‎the developmental appropriateness of adolescent novelty-seeking and ‎experimentation, and draw upon the most recent literature to help adolescents reduce ‎negative health outcomes of marijuana use. Participants will leave with strategies to ‎help providers and adolescents navigate the changing landscape of marijuana use ‎together.

    Learning Objectives:  

    1. Recognize legalization status changes across the country and recent youth trends in ‎marijuana use. 
    2. Hear from adolescents about their attitudes and beliefs related to marijuana use, its ‎impact, and what health messaging they find effective. 
    3. Learn strategies for discussing marijuana use and approaches to assist youth with ‎positive behavior change.

    Jenni Lane

    Catherine Miller

    Anum Latif

    Jeren Ghoujeghi

    Thaliana Smith-Ponce

  • Keeping Young People Connected with Each Other and Their Professional Networks: Creative approaches for running online groups and meetings

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: Keeping Young People Connected with Each Other and Their Professional Networks: Creative approaches for running online groups and meetings

    Keeping Young People Connected with Each Other and Their Professional Networks: Creative approaches for running online groups and meetings
    Thursday, March 11, 2021 - 4:30-5:30 p.m. ET

    Track: Core Clinical Topics
    Live ONLY


    Session Leaders: Sara Portnoy, University of College London Hospital (UCLH) and Life Force; Halina Flanner, University of College London Hospital (UCLH); James McParlan, University of College London Hospital (UCLH) and Life Force

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on young people, disrupting education, routines, hobbies and peer interactions with increasing concern for longer term effects on physical and mental health outcomes. Young people living with chronic health conditions face additional challenges including reduced or no face to face contact with medical teams, shielding and the increased stressors of being in ‘at-risk’ groups and social isolation. In a climate of social isolation and disconnectedness, virtual online groups and meetings can provide a method of delivering healthcare that strengthens social connectedness, reduces isolation and increases accessibility. The pandemic has provided a unique opportunity, and necessity, to embrace technology that has long existed and learning from this can help to transform the future of adolescent health.

    Learning Objectives: 

    1. Implement effective methods of beginning online groups.
    2. Use techniques to enable young people to engage and connect in an online group setting.
    3. Explain what goes on ‘behind the scenes’ of an effective online group – before, during and after.
    4. Consider how these ideas can be taken into their practice.

    To help make the online workshop as useful to you as possible we invite you to join us with these tips:

    1. Be present. We encourage you to attend the online workshop from home if possible, or a private space, to allow you to be fully present and not distracted by the demands of work. We encourage you to close down your emails and other tabs, and turn off your mobile is possible.
    2. Be comfortable. Wherever you are joining from, try to ensure your workspace is comfortable and private, you are able to talk freely and that you are happy with what you are sharing in your background.
    3. Be visible. It will be an interactive workshop and we ask that you keep your camera on for the duration of the training to enable full participation.
    4. Move. We appreciate that remote working invites aches and pains. Please move around, stand up and stretch as you need to.
    5. Interact. We want to interact with you! Please ask questions and join in through the chat function, using emojis or waving your hands wildly.

     Materials required: a couple of sheets of A4 paper, a felt tip pen, and an open mind! 

    Halina Flannery

    Sara Portnoy

    James McParland

  • The Onus on Adolescent Medicine to Train the Next Generation of Health ‎Professionals to Integrate Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Workshop: The Onus on Adolescent Medicine to Train the Next Generation of Health ‎Professionals to Integrate Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    The Onus on Adolescent Medicine to Train the Next Generation of Health ‎Professionals to Integrate Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    View session recording

    Link to Slides

    Track: Clinical Advances
    Eligible for CME/CE Credits = 1.0

    Session Leaders: Ana Radovic, MD, MSc, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh; Brian Pitts, MD, Children's Hospital Colorado; Matthew C. Aalsma, PhD, HSPP, Indiana University School of Medicine; Robert McKinney, MSW, LCSW, ACSW, PhD,University of Alabama; Preeti M. Galagali, MD, PGDAP, FIAP, Bengaluru Adolescent Care and Counselling Centre; Merrian Brooks, MD, University of Pennsylvania Perelman Medical School; Laura P. Richardson, MD, MPH, University of Washington, Seattle Children's 

    Description: Adolescent depression is globally recognized as a major cause of disability, and is the ‎strongest risk factor for adolescent suicide, a rising cause of death in adolescents ‎across the world. Prevention and early diagnosis and treatment can improve outcomes, ‎thereby transforming risk into wellness. Unfortunately, ten years pass on average ‎before most children and adolescents access mental health services. As a ‎multidisciplinary organization, SAHM members are uniquely positioned to understand ‎benefits of different disciplines working as a team for the benefit of a depressed ‎adolescent and be able to apply team-based approaches. The integrated behavioral ‎health (IBH) model is one that has been shown to be effective for reducing symptoms ‎of depression in multiple adult studies, and more recently by Dr. Richardson in a large ‎trial in adolescent primary care.

    The SAHM Mental Health Committee has developed a ‎position paper to propose training competencies, programs, and funding and ‎reimbursement priorities needed to develop robust behavioral health training systems ‎which will optimize mental health treatment outcomes.

    Session content will include:

    1. A ‎brief overview of current evidence-based recommendations for IBH. 
    2. Published quality improvement intervention which benefited from social work trainees
    3. Decision support systems in primary care.
    4. Current primary care ‎mental health competencies. 
    5. International perspectives on ‎mental health services. 
    6. Case-based discussion ‎on funding and reimbursement concerns.

    Quotes from AYA regarding ‎perceptions of benefits of receiving treatment in primary care will be featured ‎throughout. 

    ‎ Learning Objectives:  

    1. Describe current evidence-based recommendations for integrated behavioral health in ‎primary care and how they may be applied in practice. 
    2. Provide examples of real world applications of integrated behavioral health in ‎adolescent medicine and how they have been iteratively evaluated through quality ‎improvement methods and implementation research. 
    3. Describe current primary care competencies in mental health diagnosis and treatment ‎‎(pediatrics, family, internal medicine, nursing), as well as in specific integrated ‎behavioral health training programs and further needs to strengthen the workforce.‎

    Ana Radovic

    Brian Pitts

    Laura Richardson

    Matthew Aalsma

    Merrian Brooks

    Preeti Galagali

    Robert McKinney